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Environment, Carbon and Forests

If you don’t pay attention to gender you will fail

GFIS - 2 hours 20 min ago

To feed the estimated 9 billion people who are expected to inhabit our planet by 2015, we need to invest in women. “It’s not enough to say we are gender neutral,” said Catherine Bertini, as she delivered the Sir John Crawford Memorial Address in Canberra, Australia on 27 August 2014. “We need to constantly ask […]

Private sector agroforestry model pays off for farmers in Laos

GFIS - 6 hours 16 min ago

The work of a private company in Lao PDR to develop agroforestry plantations that actively engage local communities is the topic of a post on the blog of the

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New climate-smart village for the Philippines

GFIS - 6 hours 39 min ago

A climate-smart village is to be established in Guinayangan in the Philippines Province of Quezon, to demonstrate how a food-secure village can also sustain the environment.

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Conserving indigenous plant resources for Africa’s future

GFIS - 7 hours 12 min ago

Scientists in East Africa are embarking on a 5-year project to conserve indigenous plant genetic resources for improved food security across the region.

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Trees to diversify and improve production in Rwanda

GFIS - 7 hours 32 min ago

Rwanda is set to receive a boost in funds to improve land management, local livelihoods and climate resilience.

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Verified Conservation Areas: A Real-Estate Market For Biodiversity?

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 21:09
By Kelley Manrick, Ecosystem Marketplace, 21 August 2014 | There are markets for silver and there are markets for houses, and it doesn’t take a genius to see the difference between the two: an ounce of silver is an ounce of silver, interchangeable with any other ounce of the same quality, but the value of a house – or any piece of property – can fluctuate with the color of the flooring. Carbon markets resemble silver markets because a ton of carbon dioxide has the same impact on the environment regardless of whether it comes from a smokestack in Germany or a forest fire in Brazil. That made it possible to create a global transparent marketplace designed to support sustainable development and identify the most efficient ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Biodiversity markets, however, have always been local because habitat is often unique and irreplaceable.

Tropical forests: A clearing in the trees

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 21:08
The Economist, 23 August 2014 | The most successful policies therefore tend to be top-down bans, rather than incentives (though these have been tried, too). India’s national forest policy of 1988 explicitly rejects the idea of trying to make money from stewardship. “The derivation of direct economic benefit”, it says, “must be subordinated to this principal aim” (maintaining the health of the forest). In Brazil 44% of the Amazon is now national park, wildlife reserve or indigenous reserve, where farming is banned; much of that area was added recently. In Costa Rica half the forests are similarly protected. In India a third are managed jointly by local groups and state governments.

[Indonesia] Couple forest protection with jobs to boost appeal, experts say

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 21:01
By Fidelis E. Satriastanti, Thomson Reuters Foundation, 21 August 2014 | Schemes to reduce climate-changing emissions from deforestation will attract more local support if they offer jobs and concrete income opportunities for forest people, Indonesian villagers and experts say. Indonesians who live in forested areas are increasingly faced with a choice between paid labour on a plantation or participating in a forest protection initiative that could improve their livelihoods down the line. Until recently, plantation work seemed the best option for many, but that may be starting to change as schemes that compensate communities for safeguarding forests get up and running.

Gambia: Community Forest Managers Trained On Forest Policy

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:58
By Abdoulie Nyockeh, The Point, 21 August 2014 | A three-day training on forest policy and step of transferring community forest rights to local communities for All Gambia Forest Platform members and community forest committees is currently underway at Sanyang Nature Camp. The sensitization drive, which targeted more than thirty Community Forest Managers operating under the All Gambia Forestry Platform, was geared towards creating awareness on Forest Policy and Regulation Act. The training, which assembled participants in the West Coast Region, was funded by the Forest and Farm Facility under the National coordinator, Kanimang Camara.

Scientists identify deforested idle land as source of Indonesia "haze" fires

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:57
By Alisa Tang, Thomson Reuters Foundation, 19 August 2014 | A month after Singapore was shrouded in a thick haze produced by Indonesian fires in June 2013, scientist David Gaveau went to the source of the smoke in Riau province to survey the charred aftermath. News reports attributed the haze to slash-and-burn forest clearance to make way for oil palm plantations. But what Gaveau, a scientist with the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), discovered during his five days examining the still-smouldering ground on Sumatra island was different.

Scientists identify deforested idle land as source of Indonesia "haze" fires

GFIS - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:57
Reuters: A month after Singapore was shrouded in a thick haze produced by Indonesian fires in June 2013, scientist David Gaveau went to the source of the smoke in Riau province to survey the charred aftermath. News reports attributed the haze to slash-and-burn forest clearance to make way for oil palm plantations. But what Gaveau, a scientist with the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), discovered during his five days examining the still-smouldering ground on Sumatra island...

In Saving a Forest, Kenyans Find a Better Quality of Life

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:56
By Peter Kahare, IPS, 20 August 2014 | When Mercy Ngaruiya first settled in Kasigau in south eastern Kenya a decade ago, she found a depleted forest that was the result of years of tree felling and bush clearing. “This region was literally burning. There were no trees on my farm when I moved here, the area was so dry and people were cutting down trees and burning bushes for their livelihood,” Ngaruiya, a community leader in Kasigau, told IPS. Back then, she says, poverty and unemployment levels were high, there was limited supply of fresh water, and education and health services were poor. Mike Korchinsky, the president of Wildlife Works, a Reduced Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) project development and management company, remembers it all too well. “When I came here, you could hear the sounds of axes as people constantly cut trees."

Ecosystem Marketplace's Forest Carbon News

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:55
Ecosystem Marketplace, 20 August 2014 | Forget presidents, kings and queens – governors may be the ones leading the fight to reduce deforestation, state by state. At last week's Governors’ Climate and Forests (GCF) Task Force meeting in Acre, Brazil, 13 of them penned the Rio Branco Declaration, named after the Amazonian city they met in. Their commitment? To cut deforestation rates in their jurisdictions 80% by 2020 – a move that would prevent four billion tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions (tCO2e) from entering the atmosphere. But they can't do it for free. Deforestation, after all, is largely about economics, and lucrative oilseed crops – mainly palm oil in Indonesia and soybeans in Brazil – are driving deforestation in key rainforest countries. GCF states say that they can slow forest clearing and degradation if performance-based funding for reducing deforestation (REDD) is available, whether through carbon markets or other performance-based payment mechanisms.

[Brazil] Conservation of Amazon threatened by poor social conditions of its people: study

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:39
By Astrid Zweynert, Reuters, 23 August 2014 | The conservation of Brazil's Amazon is threatened by the poor social conditions of its 24 million inhabitants, the first comprehensive study measuring the situation found on Saturday. Lack of access to clean water, violence, illiteracy and limited opportunities to pursue a better life are among the problems highlighted in the Social Progress Index (SPI) for the Amazon, one of the world's most important ecosystems. The study paints a picture of social injustice and inequality by charting data from all but one of the region's 773 municipalities and nine states. Researchers hope it will become a tool for improving development policy as Brazil elects a new president in October.

Scientists warn about 'precarious' state of world's primary forests

REDD monitor news - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 20:37
Daily News & Analysis, 24 August 2014 | Scientists have warned about the precarious state of the world's primary forests, as a new study shows that say just 22% of these forests are located in protected areas, equivalent of only 5% of the original ones. Brendan Mackey, Director of the Climate Change Response Program at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia, said that international negotiations are failing to halt the loss of the world's most important primary forests and in the absence of specific policies for primary forest protection in biodiversity and climate change treaties, their unique biodiversity values and ecosystem services will continue to be lost in both developed and developing countries.

Rich nations have moral duty to help island nations as climate change shifts weather patterns

GFIS - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 19:01
Sydney Morning Herald: Small island nations, particularly those in the Pacific, are already experiencing "extreme effects" from global warming, and rich nations including Australia have a "moral responsibility" to help them cope with future unavoidable threats, a senior World Bank executive said. Atoll nations including Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands are seeing shifting rainfall patterns, rising sea-levels and ocean acidification that are forcing islanders to move, said Rachel Kyte, the World Bank's special...

ITTO releases an on-line project search tool Making knowledge available with a few clicks!

GFIS - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 17:00
ITTO has just released an on-line project search tool, in order to further disseminate, capitalize and enhance the knowledge it has gained through the implementation of field projects in sustainable forest management (SFM) since it began operations in 1986. This information is now available at your fingertips on the ITTO homepage, with just a few clicks away. The on-line project search allows public reference to all projects implemented with ITTO funding, as well as currently operational projects and projects seeking financing. For all the projects, a small summary of the aim of the project is provided, while for those projects which are on-going or were declared completed from the year 2000 and onwards –over 500– a set of outputs and other documents have been made available for download, including: Project document, Completion report (if relevant), Technical report(s), Ex-post evaluation report (if relevant), Promotional material (posters, brochures, leaflets, etc.). The project search tool also allows searching by specific parameters, which can be combined in order to refine the search, such as: Project ID, Keyword (this function not only searches the title but also in the summary of the project), Country, Donor, Status (completed, operational or seeking financing), Areas of work (economics, statistics and markets; forest industry; and reforestation and forest management), and Thematic Programmes. With the launch of the on-line project search tool, ITTO is taking a step further in enhancing knowledge-sharing and enabling its use among the various stakeholders of the tropical timber and tropical forest sectors. The project search tool can be accessed at http://www.itto.int/project_search/

ITTO releases an on-line project search tool; making knowledge available with a few clicks!

GFIS - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 17:00
ITTO has just released an on-line project search tool, in order to further disseminate, capitalize and enhance the knowledge it has gained through the implementation of field projects in sustainable forest management (SFM) since it began operations in 1986. This information is now available at your fingertips on the ITTO homepage, with just a few clicks away.

Pests Pose Increasing Risk to Food Security

GFIS - Sun, 31/08/2014 - 16:03
Climate News Network: Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. Wherever pests can make a living, they will. None of this bodes well for food security in a world of nine billion people and increasingly rapid climate change By 2050, according to new research in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, those opportunistic viruses, bacteria, fungi, blights, mildews, rusts, beetles, nematodes, flies, mites, spiders and...

When forests aren't really forests: the high cost of Chile’s tree plantations

REDD monitor news - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 23:54
By Juliam Moll-Rocek, mongabay.com, 18 August 2014 | At first glance, the statistics tell a hopeful story: Chile’s forests are expanding. According to Global Forest Watch, overall forest cover changes show approximately 300,000 hectares were gained between 2000 and 2013 in Chile’s central and southern regions. Specifically, 1.4 million hectares of forest cover were gained, while about 1.1 million hectares were lost. On the ground, however, a different scene plays out: monocultures have replaced diverse natural forests while Mapuche native protesters burn pine plantations, blockade roads and destroy logging equipment. At the crux of these two starkly contrasting narratives is the definition of a single word: “forest.”

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by Dr. Radut