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Chainsaw carvings of storm wood

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:54

A Queensland artist is carving wooden wombats, koalas and goannas out of tree stumps and branches that fell during recent storms in Brisbane for a new art project. Sources: Yahoo News, ABC News Artist Matthew George, who is known as Matty G, has created more than 30 animals throughout the Queensland University of Technology’s (QUT) Kelvin Grove campus. The creative carver takes tree stumps and carves them into wooden animals, using only a chainsaw. Mr George said the project aimed to get people to look up from their phones, connect with each other, and create sustainable artwork. “One of the nicest things for me is when I am carving, they stop take photos and show interest,” he said. “The aim of this project is for people to reconnect and enjoy something like this; it colours the university up a bit.” Mr George said the project evolves as each animal is created. “I take a look at the tree and see what can come of it,” he said. “I have visions which is natural and I make suggestions and then we decided then and there on what we will do. “My favourite is the kangaroo, it is fun [and people] appreciate him.” Grounds manager Naomi Hewitt said the idea came about after visiting the Maleny wood-working festival. “I saw Matty creating something absolutely beautiful from a stump and thought it would be fantastic for the university,” she said. “We had quite a few trees down due to storms so I contacted Matty and he came down and it started from there. “The key thing about going to university is to learn but you need to have a beautiful environment too.” Students are urged to spot the native animals that have been placed in trees, above car parks and alongside lunch tables. Ms Hewitt said the animals have become a talking point for students, especially the international students. “Students stop to find them,” she said. “We have had people take photos of the birds and then realise they are not real, it gives me a chuckle when I walk past them and hear them say that.”

The post Chainsaw carvings of storm wood appeared first on Timberbiz.

Mamaku sawmill shuts in NZ

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:51

Twenty-five Mamaku Sawmilling Company workers have lost their jobs and were officially told after a meeting with the owner’s solicitors and union representatives yesterday.  Source: Rotorua Daily Post Employees were told last week a closure was on the cards for the mill, which has been running for about 70 years. Company director Bill Taylor released a statement last week, saying the mill had been losing money since 2012. It cited external factors for the closure. “Along with numerous sawmills around New Zealand that have closed, Mamaku Sawmilling Co Ltd has struggled to combat the difficult trading conditions. The business has been adversely impacted by increases in the price and availability of pruned logs, and the historically high exchange rate. “The company’s processing site in Ngongotaha, where 20 employees are employed, will continue to operate while other options are considered,” Mr Taylor said. Former mill operator Sam Simpkins had worked at the mill for nearly 30 years. “It was a huge shock. I have been here for 30 years. It’s devastating for the area. There used to be 15 mills down here,” he said. “I am of retiring age, but I still feel I can put in a good day’s work. I am weighing up my options but I will probably look for work elsewhere.” Mr Simpkins was not concerned about finding another job at a mill in the area. The company has organised for local recruitment agencies to help prepare CVs for any employees at no cost, and has arranged for Work and Income staff to be on site to assist workers with financial and job search assistance. Workers will receive their normal pay until April 8. However, production at the sawmill will end next Tuesday. Engineering Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) organiser Red Middlemiss said the company had been a good employer. “This business has never been about them and us and they have been a good employer. Still, it’s outside circumstances that have made them shut down. They are doing their best. “A lot of the guys already have jobs, which makes it a little bit less painful.” He blamed the current economic climate for the closure. “It is lack of foresight by successive governments, that’s all it is. They sold off all of our forests, so it loses that personal contact. No one cares about the workers. They just want to know that the logs are coming out. “We’ve negotiated that the non-union members get the payout as well,” he said.

The post Mamaku sawmill shuts in NZ appeared first on Timberbiz.

Mamaku sawmill shuts in NZ

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:51

Twenty-five Mamaku Sawmilling Company workers have lost their jobs and were officially told after a meeting with the owner’s solicitors and union representatives yesterday.  Source: Rotorua Daily Post Employees were told last week a closure was on the cards for the mill, which has been running for about 70 years. Company director Bill Taylor released a statement last week, saying the mill had been losing money since 2012. It cited external factors for the closure. “Along with numerous sawmills around New Zealand that have closed, Mamaku Sawmilling Co Ltd has struggled to combat the difficult trading conditions. The business has been adversely impacted by increases in the price and availability of pruned logs, and the historically high exchange rate. “The company’s processing site in Ngongotaha, where 20 employees are employed, will continue to operate while other options are considered,” Mr Taylor said. Former mill operator Sam Simpkins had worked at the mill for nearly 30 years. “It was a huge shock. I have been here for 30 years. It’s devastating for the area. There used to be 15 mills down here,” he said. “I am of retiring age, but I still feel I can put in a good day’s work. I am weighing up my options but I will probably look for work elsewhere.” Mr Simpkins was not concerned about finding another job at a mill in the area. The company has organised for local recruitment agencies to help prepare CVs for any employees at no cost, and has arranged for Work and Income staff to be on site to assist workers with financial and job search assistance. Workers will receive their normal pay until April 8. However, production at the sawmill will end next Tuesday. Engineering Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) organiser Red Middlemiss said the company had been a good employer. “This business has never been about them and us and they have been a good employer. Still, it’s outside circumstances that have made them shut down. They are doing their best. “A lot of the guys already have jobs, which makes it a little bit less painful.” He blamed the current economic climate for the closure. “It is lack of foresight by successive governments, that’s all it is. They sold off all of our forests, so it loses that personal contact. No one cares about the workers. They just want to know that the logs are coming out. “We’ve negotiated that the non-union members get the payout as well,” he said.

The post Mamaku sawmill shuts in NZ appeared first on Timberbiz.

Repossed HarvestPro equipment

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:50

A major financier has repossessed equipment from the owner of forestry business HarvestPro New Zealand. An official from GE Finance and Insurance in Auckland said equipment located in Auckland, Gisborne and Northland was repossessed from the company KFI Asset Management. Source: New Zealand Herald Frederika Wall, GE Finance and Insurance spokeswoman confirmed the action, which she said took place last week. Companies Office records showed HarvestPro New Zealand is fully owned by Kiwi Forestry International. “It is anticipated that the equipment will be marketed for sale in the coming weeks,” Ms Wall said. A Northland Regional Councillor expressed fears for the futures of 100 forestry staff that worked for the forestry giant in his area. Joe Carr said he was now trying to help the workers to get new jobs “albeit temporarily” because they were laid off suddenly this week, some stranded in forests 20km to 30km from home and made to walk out. Trouble has hit the area in the midst of the hotly contested by-election, which has focused all eyes on Northland. HarvestPro has big Northland and Gisborne area operations and is headquartered in Auckland. Attempts to contact the business have been unsuccessful and phones have been ringing unanswered. Mr Carr said he was particularly concerned about people who had worked for Harvestpro in his area. He expressed wider fears for the sector in Northland. “Large areas of forestry are not being replanted because it’s not economically viable, particularly around the Hokianga and Kawakawa, there’s thousands of hectares of there. If the replant doesn’t happen in North Hokianga, that’s a cost of $500 million,” he said, although others had put the cost to closer $800 million.

The post Repossed HarvestPro equipment appeared first on Timberbiz.

Repossed HarvestPro equipment

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:50

A major financier has repossessed equipment from the owner of forestry business HarvestPro New Zealand. An official from GE Finance and Insurance in Auckland said equipment located in Auckland, Gisborne and Northland was repossessed from the company KFI Asset Management. Source: New Zealand Herald Frederika Wall, GE Finance and Insurance spokeswoman confirmed the action, which she said took place last week. Companies Office records showed HarvestPro New Zealand is fully owned by Kiwi Forestry International. “It is anticipated that the equipment will be marketed for sale in the coming weeks,” Ms Wall said. A Northland Regional Councillor expressed fears for the futures of 100 forestry staff that worked for the forestry giant in his area. Joe Carr said he was now trying to help the workers to get new jobs “albeit temporarily” because they were laid off suddenly this week, some stranded in forests 20km to 30km from home and made to walk out. Trouble has hit the area in the midst of the hotly contested by-election, which has focused all eyes on Northland. HarvestPro has big Northland and Gisborne area operations and is headquartered in Auckland. Attempts to contact the business have been unsuccessful and phones have been ringing unanswered. Mr Carr said he was particularly concerned about people who had worked for Harvestpro in his area. He expressed wider fears for the sector in Northland. “Large areas of forestry are not being replanted because it’s not economically viable, particularly around the Hokianga and Kawakawa, there’s thousands of hectares of there. If the replant doesn’t happen in North Hokianga, that’s a cost of $500 million,” he said, although others had put the cost to closer $800 million.

The post Repossed HarvestPro equipment appeared first on Timberbiz.

Solomon Islands sawn timber to Aust & NZ

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:49

A group of Solomon Islands timber exporters and government officials visited Australia and New Zealand to promote exports of sawn timber. Sources: Scoop News, Timberbiz The export mission started in Brisbane on 22 – 25 March and moved to Auckland from 25-30 March 2015. The group met with importers and government officials including a meeting with the New Zealand Timber Importers Association at the Pacific Islands Trade & Invest office in Newmarket. As 60% of sawn timber is sold to markets in Australia and New Zealand, the visits aimed to increase understanding among exporters and importers of market requirements and opportunities for Solomon Islands sawn timber. At present, the vast majority of Solomon Islands timber is exported to China as unprocessed round logs, with wide recognition of the unsustainable level of harvesting. This delegation focused on promoting exports of sawn timber as part of a wider goal of adding value to timber exports. Sawn timber exports from Solomon Islands are valued at over SBD 80 million or around USD $9.5 million per year and the industry employs more than 1000 people. The mission was funded by the Pacific Horticultural & Agricultural Market Access (PHAMA) program, as a follow-up to market studies conducted in 2014. Based on those studies, the Solomon Islands Timber Industry Working Group recognised the need to better understand market requirements in Australia and New Zealand, and made the trade mission a priority. The eight-member delegation consisted of five private sector timber exporters, two officials from the Solomon Islands Ministry of Forestry and Research and a PHAMA representative. A key part of the mission centred on importers and exporters exchanging information relating to market requirements for timber legality and quality. Markets in the EU and the United States have already introduced the requirement to demonstrate the legal origin of imported forestry products. Australia implemented similar legislation in November 2014, while New Zealand (which currently has a voluntary code of practice) could also follow suit. Other equally important discussions included opportunities to improve timber quality and presentation, processing and end product requirements, supply, consistency and potential markets for alternative species. Opportunities for potential collaboration with importers to improve the timber processing quality in Solomon Islands were also examined. The outcomes from the mission will be shared in the Solomon Islands adding to the development of the timber export industry. PHAMA is designed to provide practical and targeted assistance to help Pacific island countries manage regulatory aspects associated with exporting primary products (including fresh and processed plant and animal products). This encompasses gaining access for novel products into new markets, and helping to manage issues associated with maintaining and improving existing trade. Australia and New Zealand are markets of major interest, along with export markets beyond the Pacific. The core countries assisted through PHAMA include Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands.

The post Solomon Islands sawn timber to Aust & NZ appeared first on Timberbiz.

Solomon Islands sawn timber to Aust & NZ

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:49

A group of Solomon Islands timber exporters and government officials visited Australia and New Zealand to promote exports of sawn timber. Sources: Scoop News, Timberbiz The export mission started in Brisbane on 22 – 25 March and moved to Auckland from 25-30 March 2015. The group met with importers and government officials including a meeting with the New Zealand Timber Importers Association at the Pacific Islands Trade & Invest office in Newmarket. As 60% of sawn timber is sold to markets in Australia and New Zealand, the visits aimed to increase understanding among exporters and importers of market requirements and opportunities for Solomon Islands sawn timber. At present, the vast majority of Solomon Islands timber is exported to China as unprocessed round logs, with wide recognition of the unsustainable level of harvesting. This delegation focused on promoting exports of sawn timber as part of a wider goal of adding value to timber exports. Sawn timber exports from Solomon Islands are valued at over SBD 80 million or around USD $9.5 million per year and the industry employs more than 1000 people. The mission was funded by the Pacific Horticultural & Agricultural Market Access (PHAMA) program, as a follow-up to market studies conducted in 2014. Based on those studies, the Solomon Islands Timber Industry Working Group recognised the need to better understand market requirements in Australia and New Zealand, and made the trade mission a priority. The eight-member delegation consisted of five private sector timber exporters, two officials from the Solomon Islands Ministry of Forestry and Research and a PHAMA representative. A key part of the mission centred on importers and exporters exchanging information relating to market requirements for timber legality and quality. Markets in the EU and the United States have already introduced the requirement to demonstrate the legal origin of imported forestry products. Australia implemented similar legislation in November 2014, while New Zealand (which currently has a voluntary code of practice) could also follow suit. Other equally important discussions included opportunities to improve timber quality and presentation, processing and end product requirements, supply, consistency and potential markets for alternative species. Opportunities for potential collaboration with importers to improve the timber processing quality in Solomon Islands were also examined. The outcomes from the mission will be shared in the Solomon Islands adding to the development of the timber export industry. PHAMA is designed to provide practical and targeted assistance to help Pacific island countries manage regulatory aspects associated with exporting primary products (including fresh and processed plant and animal products). This encompasses gaining access for novel products into new markets, and helping to manage issues associated with maintaining and improving existing trade. Australia and New Zealand are markets of major interest, along with export markets beyond the Pacific. The core countries assisted through PHAMA include Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands.

The post Solomon Islands sawn timber to Aust & NZ appeared first on Timberbiz.

Health benefits of wood

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:48

Exposure to wood products and interiors has measurable health benefits, similar those created by spending time in nature, a new report commissioned by Planet Ark has found. Source: Timberbiz There are significant health, well being and environmental benefits to incorporating wood and timber products into our everyday lives, yet less than one in two Australians make this important connection. These findings are published in Planet Ark’s Wood – Housing, Health, Humanity report. The report explores numerous studies analysing the health and wellbeing benefits of wooden interiors in homes, businesses, places of learning and places for healing, as well as the results of an independent Australian survey. “An increasing body of research is beginning to show that being surrounded by wood at home, work or school has positive effects on the body, the brain and the environment and can even shorten hospital stays through reduced recovery times,” said Chris Philpot, Make it Wood Campaign Manager at Planet Ark. Increasing urbanisation means that people have less access to nature in their daily lives and Australians on average now spend over 90% of their time indoors. This has well reported health consequences, so understanding how to incorporate the many benefits of nature into our indoor environments is an increasingly important area of research. The studies examining the effects of wooden rooms and furnishings clearly demonstrate that the presence of wood has positive physiological and psychological benefits that mimic the effect of spending time outside in nature. The feelings of natural warmth and comfort that wood elicits in people has the effect of lowering blood pressure and heart rates, reducing stress and anxiety and increasing positive social interactions. Wood products within a room have also been shown to improve indoor air quality by moderating humidity. These benefits are particularly important for environments where it is difficult to incorporate nature indoors, such as hospitals where strict health guidelines may prevent the presence of plants, and office environments where views from the window are of roads and neighbouring concrete buildings. An increasing number of architects who design buildings for healing, learning and relaxation are now incorporating significant amounts of wood into their structures to capitalise on its health and wellbeing benefits. According to Planet Ark’s survey 96% of Australians agreed that wood is visually appealing and has a natural look and feel. Even though many people don’t understand the health and wellbeing benefits of wood, they appeared to be innately drawn towards wood and instinctively react to the feelings of warmth, comfort and relaxation it creates. When Planet Ark presented survey participants with images of two rooms, one furnished with a wooden chair, desk, blinds and other items made from wood, while the other showed the same items made from plastic, two out of every three people said they preferred the wooden room. This occurred despite one in two people saying they were completely unaware that wood had associated health benefits. In addition to its health impacts, the use of responsibly sourced, certified wood can have significant positive environmental outcomes and help reduce climate change. Yet only six out of 10 survey participants understood that wood stores carbon and creates less carbon emissions during production than steel and concrete. With the global population growing, increasing rates of urbanisation and the construction of new buildings is inevitable. Wood is one of the oldest and most versatile building materials used by humanity and its revival shows it has a large part to play in building a healthy future.

The post Health benefits of wood appeared first on Timberbiz.

Health benefits of wood

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:48

Exposure to wood products and interiors has measurable health benefits, similar those created by spending time in nature, a new report commissioned by Planet Ark has found. Source: Timberbiz There are significant health, well being and environmental benefits to incorporating wood and timber products into our everyday lives, yet less than one in two Australians make this important connection. These findings are published in Planet Ark’s Wood – Housing, Health, Humanity report. The report explores numerous studies analysing the health and wellbeing benefits of wooden interiors in homes, businesses, places of learning and places for healing, as well as the results of an independent Australian survey. “An increasing body of research is beginning to show that being surrounded by wood at home, work or school has positive effects on the body, the brain and the environment and can even shorten hospital stays through reduced recovery times,” said Chris Philpot, Make it Wood Campaign Manager at Planet Ark. Increasing urbanisation means that people have less access to nature in their daily lives and Australians on average now spend over 90% of their time indoors. This has well reported health consequences, so understanding how to incorporate the many benefits of nature into our indoor environments is an increasingly important area of research. The studies examining the effects of wooden rooms and furnishings clearly demonstrate that the presence of wood has positive physiological and psychological benefits that mimic the effect of spending time outside in nature. The feelings of natural warmth and comfort that wood elicits in people has the effect of lowering blood pressure and heart rates, reducing stress and anxiety and increasing positive social interactions. Wood products within a room have also been shown to improve indoor air quality by moderating humidity. These benefits are particularly important for environments where it is difficult to incorporate nature indoors, such as hospitals where strict health guidelines may prevent the presence of plants, and office environments where views from the window are of roads and neighbouring concrete buildings. An increasing number of architects who design buildings for healing, learning and relaxation are now incorporating significant amounts of wood into their structures to capitalise on its health and wellbeing benefits. According to Planet Ark’s survey 96% of Australians agreed that wood is visually appealing and has a natural look and feel. Even though many people don’t understand the health and wellbeing benefits of wood, they appeared to be innately drawn towards wood and instinctively react to the feelings of warmth, comfort and relaxation it creates. When Planet Ark presented survey participants with images of two rooms, one furnished with a wooden chair, desk, blinds and other items made from wood, while the other showed the same items made from plastic, two out of every three people said they preferred the wooden room. This occurred despite one in two people saying they were completely unaware that wood had associated health benefits. In addition to its health impacts, the use of responsibly sourced, certified wood can have significant positive environmental outcomes and help reduce climate change. Yet only six out of 10 survey participants understood that wood stores carbon and creates less carbon emissions during production than steel and concrete. With the global population growing, increasing rates of urbanisation and the construction of new buildings is inevitable. Wood is one of the oldest and most versatile building materials used by humanity and its revival shows it has a large part to play in building a healthy future.

The post Health benefits of wood appeared first on Timberbiz.

Forest Owners discourage deforestation

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:45

The Forest Owners Association (FOA) is calling on the Government to do more to discourage deforestation in New Zealand. Sources: Timberbiz. Scoop News, Radio New Zealand On United Nations International Day of Forests held on 21 March, the association said the Government was failing to recognise the role they play in combating climate change. Chief executive FOA, David Rhodes, said about 10000 hectares was deforested in New Zealand last year, as owners pursued more lucrative means of using the land, such as dairying. He said to reverse that trend the Government could do more to raise the price of carbon credits from about NZ$6 each to NZ$15. Mr Rhodes said that would encourage owners to retain or replant their forests. Forest owners and wood processors worldwide are calling for governments to recognise the role of forests and wood products in combating climate change. Forests and climate change was the theme of the 2015 United Nations International Day of Forests. “What we are looking for is a real carbon price that reflects the value of tree planting. Not one that has been watered down,” said Forest Owners Association president Paul Nicholls. “We need consistent long term policies that give forest owners the confidence to retain existing forests and plant new ones.” The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations promote both measures globally. The council said that a clear long-term agreement is needed globally in order to reap the positive contributions of forests and forest products in combating climate change. Mr Nicholls said that New Zealand needs to be lobbying in global forums for policies that provide forest owners with an income for the ecosystem services they provide. It also needs to be walking the talk by having these policies in place at home. UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon said political commitment at the highest levels is needed, along with smart policies and innovative partnerships, to build a sustainable, climate-resilient future for all. He said that means investing in the world’s forests. “While New Zealand has an Emissions Trading Scheme it has been watered-down to such an extent that in each of the last two years, we estimate that about 10,000 hectares were deforested – a figure that under existing policy settings could climb rapidly from 2020 when forests planted in the 1990s are harvested,” Mr Nicholls said. He said the loss of forests and their conversion to farming results in a climate double-whammy. Deforestation results in a greenhouse gas spike, then there are ongoing emissions from the new land use. As a forester, he said it personally saddens him to see large-scale deforestation, but the owners are simply responding to government policies and market signals. “For this situation to be reversed our major political parties need to re-think their land-use policies and put the underlying principles of the RMA into practice. “Forest owners need to be rewarded, not penalised, for the eco-system services their forests provide the country and other land users.” He said the message that successive governments and regional councils have been giving land owners is that when there is an environmental issue, livestock farming will always be advantaged as a land use over forestry. “Time after time, the environmental services provided by forestry are either devalued – as with carbon in post-1989 forests – or nationalised – as with nitrogen from livestock in the Lake Taupo catchment. “Such policies have the effect of raising land values for farmland, making it unaffordable for forest planting. “Secondly, they reduce the value of forest land relative to other land uses. It’s a powerful incentive not to plant trees. “As if this was not enough, we now have some farmer groups lobbying to prevent further dairy conversions in some catchments. Instead of calling for nitrogen emissions to be allocated evenly to all land users in the catchment, which would be in accord with RMA principles, they are in effect signalling to forest owners to convert to dairy while they still have time.” Mr Nicholls said the irony is that increased forest planting is a win for the economy and a win for the environment.

The post Forest Owners discourage deforestation appeared first on Timberbiz.

Forest Owners discourage deforestation

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:45

The Forest Owners Association (FOA) is calling on the Government to do more to discourage deforestation in New Zealand. Sources: Timberbiz. Scoop News, Radio New Zealand On United Nations International Day of Forests held on 21 March, the association said the Government was failing to recognise the role they play in combating climate change. Chief executive FOA, David Rhodes, said about 10000 hectares was deforested in New Zealand last year, as owners pursued more lucrative means of using the land, such as dairying. He said to reverse that trend the Government could do more to raise the price of carbon credits from about NZ$6 each to NZ$15. Mr Rhodes said that would encourage owners to retain or replant their forests. Forest owners and wood processors worldwide are calling for governments to recognise the role of forests and wood products in combating climate change. Forests and climate change was the theme of the 2015 United Nations International Day of Forests. “What we are looking for is a real carbon price that reflects the value of tree planting. Not one that has been watered down,” said Forest Owners Association president Paul Nicholls. “We need consistent long term policies that give forest owners the confidence to retain existing forests and plant new ones.” The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations promote both measures globally. The council said that a clear long-term agreement is needed globally in order to reap the positive contributions of forests and forest products in combating climate change. Mr Nicholls said that New Zealand needs to be lobbying in global forums for policies that provide forest owners with an income for the ecosystem services they provide. It also needs to be walking the talk by having these policies in place at home. UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon said political commitment at the highest levels is needed, along with smart policies and innovative partnerships, to build a sustainable, climate-resilient future for all. He said that means investing in the world’s forests. “While New Zealand has an Emissions Trading Scheme it has been watered-down to such an extent that in each of the last two years, we estimate that about 10,000 hectares were deforested – a figure that under existing policy settings could climb rapidly from 2020 when forests planted in the 1990s are harvested,” Mr Nicholls said. He said the loss of forests and their conversion to farming results in a climate double-whammy. Deforestation results in a greenhouse gas spike, then there are ongoing emissions from the new land use. As a forester, he said it personally saddens him to see large-scale deforestation, but the owners are simply responding to government policies and market signals. “For this situation to be reversed our major political parties need to re-think their land-use policies and put the underlying principles of the RMA into practice. “Forest owners need to be rewarded, not penalised, for the eco-system services their forests provide the country and other land users.” He said the message that successive governments and regional councils have been giving land owners is that when there is an environmental issue, livestock farming will always be advantaged as a land use over forestry. “Time after time, the environmental services provided by forestry are either devalued – as with carbon in post-1989 forests – or nationalised – as with nitrogen from livestock in the Lake Taupo catchment. “Such policies have the effect of raising land values for farmland, making it unaffordable for forest planting. “Secondly, they reduce the value of forest land relative to other land uses. It’s a powerful incentive not to plant trees. “As if this was not enough, we now have some farmer groups lobbying to prevent further dairy conversions in some catchments. Instead of calling for nitrogen emissions to be allocated evenly to all land users in the catchment, which would be in accord with RMA principles, they are in effect signalling to forest owners to convert to dairy while they still have time.” Mr Nicholls said the irony is that increased forest planting is a win for the economy and a win for the environment.

The post Forest Owners discourage deforestation appeared first on Timberbiz.

NZ forests gain international visibility

Australian timber industry news - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:44

  An increasing number of companies in New Zealand are taking on PEFC Chain of Custody certification. Source: Timberbiz With the acceptance of the NZ Forest Certification Association (NZFCA) as New Zealand’s PEFC member, New Zealand forest growers gain visibility in the world’s leading forest certification system. “We are delighted to be accepted into membership of PEFC and to represent PEFC in New Zealand,” said Dr Andrew McEwen, chair of NZFCA. With more than 260 million hectares of certified forests, PEFC (Program for Endorsement of Forest Certification) is the world’s leading forest certification system, promoting sustainable forest management through independent third party certification. PEFC works throughout the entire forest supply chain to promote good practice in the forest and to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with respect for the highest ecological, social and ethical standards. Thanks to its eco-label, customers and consumers are able to identify products from sustainably managed forests. Many of the countries that purchase New Zealand forest products (or compete with NZ exports) are already PEFC members, including China, Japan, Indonesia, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Russia, and USA. Other major markets such as India are also looking at joining. “It makes sense for New Zealand forest growers to be in a position to supply PEFC certified forest products to all these markets,” said Dr McEwen. NZFCA hopes to have a PEFC endorsed certification system based on the New Zealand Standard for Sustainable Forest Management (NZS AS 4708:2014) in place later this year. The NZ Standard is an adoption of the Australian Forestry Standard (AS 4708:2013) that is the basis for the PEFC endorsed Australian Forest Certification system. NZFCA is working closely with Australian Forestry Standard Ltd., in order to benefit from the close relationships between the two countries with many forest owners, managers and processors operating in both. “We acknowledge the assistance we have had from Australian Forestry Standard Ltd., financial assistance from the Wood Council of NZ who initiated the project, support from Standards NZ, financial assistance from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the support of PEFC,” said Dr McEwen. “Without their support we could not have so much progress in such a short time. “We are pleased for New Zealand to join PEFC, and its commitment to support sustainable forest management,” said Ben Gunneberg, PEFC secretary general. “We appreciate the tremendous efforts of stakeholders in New Zealand in establishing NZFCA, and we are looking forward to a long and fruitful collaboration advancing responsible forestry and trade in forest products.” An increasing number of companies in New Zealand are taking on PEFC Chain of Custody certification, enabling them to manufacture and trade PEFC-certified products and utilize the PEFC label, which has been found to be the most trusted forest certification label globally. Until now, this only has only been possible with imported material. Endorsement by PEFC of a New Zealand forest management certification system will allow New Zealand forest owners to obtain certification for their responsible management practices and allow processors and others along the forest products supply chain will be able to procure PEFC-certified material from local, sustainable managed sources. “This will be beneficial for all those along the forest products value chain, from forest growers to manufacturers and exporters as it opens up opportunities for new markets for forest products produced from NZ forests,” said Dr McEwen.

The post NZ forests gain international visibility appeared first on Timberbiz.

NZ forests gain international visibility

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:44

  An increasing number of companies in New Zealand are taking on PEFC Chain of Custody certification. Source: Timberbiz With the acceptance of the NZ Forest Certification Association (NZFCA) as New Zealand’s PEFC member, New Zealand forest growers gain visibility in the world’s leading forest certification system. “We are delighted to be accepted into membership of PEFC and to represent PEFC in New Zealand,” said Dr Andrew McEwen, chair of NZFCA. With more than 260 million hectares of certified forests, PEFC (Program for Endorsement of Forest Certification) is the world’s leading forest certification system, promoting sustainable forest management through independent third party certification. PEFC works throughout the entire forest supply chain to promote good practice in the forest and to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with respect for the highest ecological, social and ethical standards. Thanks to its eco-label, customers and consumers are able to identify products from sustainably managed forests. Many of the countries that purchase New Zealand forest products (or compete with NZ exports) are already PEFC members, including China, Japan, Indonesia, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Russia, and USA. Other major markets such as India are also looking at joining. “It makes sense for New Zealand forest growers to be in a position to supply PEFC certified forest products to all these markets,” said Dr McEwen. NZFCA hopes to have a PEFC endorsed certification system based on the New Zealand Standard for Sustainable Forest Management (NZS AS 4708:2014) in place later this year. The NZ Standard is an adoption of the Australian Forestry Standard (AS 4708:2013) that is the basis for the PEFC endorsed Australian Forest Certification system. NZFCA is working closely with Australian Forestry Standard Ltd., in order to benefit from the close relationships between the two countries with many forest owners, managers and processors operating in both. “We acknowledge the assistance we have had from Australian Forestry Standard Ltd., financial assistance from the Wood Council of NZ who initiated the project, support from Standards NZ, financial assistance from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the support of PEFC,” said Dr McEwen. “Without their support we could not have so much progress in such a short time. “We are pleased for New Zealand to join PEFC, and its commitment to support sustainable forest management,” said Ben Gunneberg, PEFC secretary general. “We appreciate the tremendous efforts of stakeholders in New Zealand in establishing NZFCA, and we are looking forward to a long and fruitful collaboration advancing responsible forestry and trade in forest products.” An increasing number of companies in New Zealand are taking on PEFC Chain of Custody certification, enabling them to manufacture and trade PEFC-certified products and utilize the PEFC label, which has been found to be the most trusted forest certification label globally. Until now, this only has only been possible with imported material. Endorsement by PEFC of a New Zealand forest management certification system will allow New Zealand forest owners to obtain certification for their responsible management practices and allow processors and others along the forest products supply chain will be able to procure PEFC-certified material from local, sustainable managed sources. “This will be beneficial for all those along the forest products value chain, from forest growers to manufacturers and exporters as it opens up opportunities for new markets for forest products produced from NZ forests,” said Dr McEwen.

The post NZ forests gain international visibility appeared first on Timberbiz.

Cocoa agroforestry could help save primates in Côte d’Ivoire

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:21

A new study recommends shade-grown cocoa agroforestry systems to prevent further deforestation in Côte d’Ivoire which is drastically impacting on primate populations.

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Agroforestry consortium launched in India

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 01:03

A Consortium of Industrial Agroforestry has been launched in India aimed at increasing green cover and coordinating efforts of different stakeholders, reports The New Indian Express.

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Kenya establishes greenhouse gas measurement centre

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 00:47

A new research facility in Kenya will more cost-effectively measure precise greenhouse gas emissions and deliver this information to policy makers.

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Sustainable strategies for sub-Saharan Africa’s declining soil fertility

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 00:32

The impact of declining soil fertility in sub-Saharan Africa and what can be done to address this issue is the subject of an article on the website of the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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Sustainable strategies for sub-Saharan Africa’s declining soil fertility

GFIS - Do, 26/03/2015 - 00:31

The impact of declining soil fertility in sub-Saharan Africa and what can be done to address this issue is the subject of an article on the website of the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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CatchMark Scheduled to Release First Quarter 2015 Earnings on May 4, 2015

Forest Products IIII - Do, 26/03/2015 - 00:14
[PR Newswire] - ATLANTA, March 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- CatchMark Timber Trust, Inc. (CTT) will release its first quarter 2015 earnings on Monday, May 4, 2015, following the market close. The company will host a conference call and live webcast at 10 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 5, 2015 to discuss these results. Headquartered in Atlanta, CatchMark Timber Trust, Inc. is a self-administered and self-managed publicly traded REIT that began operations in 2007 and owns interests in approximately 393,300 acres* of timberland located in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas. Listed on the NYSE (CTT), CatchMark provides institutions and individuals an opportunity to invest in a public company focused exclusively on timberland ownership with an objective of producing stockholder returns from sustainably recurring harvests. For more information, visit www.catchmark.com. From time to time, CatchMark releases important information via postings on its corporate website.

Tandai lokasi (geotag) tweet anda

GFIS - Mi, 25/03/2015 - 21:29
English version here. Panggilan bagi seluruh pengguna Twitter! Global Forest Watch membutuhkan bantuan Anda untuk menunjukkan dampak kebakaran hutan dan lahan di Asia Tenggara melalui peta percakapan Twitter pada platform GFW Fires. Dengan menggunakan peta GFW Fires, Anda dapat melacak dan ikut serta dalam percakapan di Twitter melalui layanan media sosial kami menggunakan tweet yang […]

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