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Lima: no LAAMA, no GAMA as INDCs replace NAMA

GFIS - vor 1 Stunde 22 Minuten
New acronyms but little new progress on action to mitigate climate change at the big event in Lima in December 2014   There is little confusion about what would be globally appropriate mitigation actions (GAMA) to keep the...

The wisdom of the crowd: Your top 20 questions for forestry and landscapes

GFIS - vor 1 Stunde 36 Minuten

  Carol Colfer and Doris Capistrano dedicate their book “The Politics of Decentralization”: Forests, Power and People” to “those whose voices have not yet been heard,” and this sentiment was at the heart of the T20Q (Top 20 Questions) project—a global project that allows you to have your say about issues of importance. The T20Q... Read more

Mexico: Monarch Levels Rebound

GFIS - vor 4 Stunden 9 Minuten
The number of Monarch butterflies that reached wintering grounds in Mexico rebounded 69 percent this year from last year’s disastrous levels, the World Wildlife Fund said.

Indonesia holds fifth national agroforestry seminar

GFIS - vor 5 Stunden 2 Minuten

Agroforestry is vital for improving productivity and incomes in the face of climate change, especially for steep terrain and small islands, according to researchers and farmers alike.   Indonesia’s Fifth National Seminar Agroforestry was held in Ambon, Maluku...

Event: UNCCD COP 12

GFIS - vor 5 Stunden 31 Minuten
The 12th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 12) to the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) will take place over two weeks in Ankara, Turkey. As the Convention's primary decision-making body, the COP will meet to discuss and make decisions regarding the Convention's implementation.

tve biomovies 2014 competition winners awarded

GFIS - vor 6 Stunden 24 Minuten

Bamboo and rattan category won by filmmakers from Nepal

The post tve biomovies 2014 competition winners awarded appeared first on INBAR.

Transportation and logistics sector lends support to global efforts tackling wildlife crime

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 5 Minuten
Bangkok, Thailand, 28th January 2015— Representatives from across the transportation and logistics sector meet later this week in Bangkok for a consultative workshop together with Customs officials, supply chain experts and wildlife professionals in order to find actionable solutions to deter wildlife smuggling activities while strengthening supply chains and corporate policies.

Undersea ice age forest

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 34 Minuten

A diving enthusiast stumbled upon an ancient forest nestled under the North Sea while diving along the Norfolk coast. Source: RT (UK) Experts say it may have stretched as far as Europe in its heyday, and has been hidden since the Ice Age. Dawn Watson, a 45-year-old British diver, discovered the 10,000-year old forest on a diving expedition off the coast of Norfolk’s Cley next the Sea. Much to her bewilderment, she discovered whole oak trees with majestic branches measuring eight meters long on the ocean floor. The pre-historic forest is believed to have been uncovered by severe storms in December 2013. Watson runs a Marine Conservation Society survey program called Seasearch in East Anglia with her partner Rob Spray. She said they were “absolutely thrilled” by the discovery. “I couldn’t believe what I was seeing at first,” she said. “The sea was quite rough by the shore so I decided to dive slightly further out and after swimming over 300 meters of sand I found a long blackened ridge.” When she observed more closely, she realized she was looking at wood. As she swam out further, she claims she saw tree trunks complete with branches that looked like they had been felled at some point. The 45-year-old, who has dived in the North Sea since 1989, said the trees are thought to be part of a forest that may have once spanned thousands of acres. The trees were part of a district known as ‘Doggerland,’ which once formed part of a much larger territory. Experts say it was so expansive that hunter-gatherers based in the area could have travelled on foot to Germany. The forest became submerged in water when ice caps disintegrated and the level of the North Sea rose by approximately 120 meters. The trees are now situated on the ocean bed where they have evolved into a natural reef infused with shoals of colorful fish, a diverse variety of plants, and other forms of marine life. In 2014, ancient forests were also discovered along Welsh and Cornish coastlines following stormy weather. As peat was washed away, crooked tree trunks surfaced on the shore near the Welsh village of Borth. Heavy rain and winds also shifted masses of sand and pebbles on beaches in Cornwall, exposing tree trunks of pine, beech, and oak.

The post Undersea ice age forest appeared first on Timberbiz.

Undersea ice age forest

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 34 Minuten

A diving enthusiast stumbled upon an ancient forest nestled under the North Sea while diving along the Norfolk coast. Source: RT (UK) Experts say it may have stretched as far as Europe in its heyday, and has been hidden since the Ice Age. Dawn Watson, a 45-year-old British diver, discovered the 10,000-year old forest on a diving expedition off the coast of Norfolk’s Cley next the Sea. Much to her bewilderment, she discovered whole oak trees with majestic branches measuring eight meters long on the ocean floor. The pre-historic forest is believed to have been uncovered by severe storms in December 2013. Watson runs a Marine Conservation Society survey program called Seasearch in East Anglia with her partner Rob Spray. She said they were “absolutely thrilled” by the discovery. “I couldn’t believe what I was seeing at first,” she said. “The sea was quite rough by the shore so I decided to dive slightly further out and after swimming over 300 meters of sand I found a long blackened ridge.” When she observed more closely, she realized she was looking at wood. As she swam out further, she claims she saw tree trunks complete with branches that looked like they had been felled at some point. The 45-year-old, who has dived in the North Sea since 1989, said the trees are thought to be part of a forest that may have once spanned thousands of acres. The trees were part of a district known as ‘Doggerland,’ which once formed part of a much larger territory. Experts say it was so expansive that hunter-gatherers based in the area could have travelled on foot to Germany. The forest became submerged in water when ice caps disintegrated and the level of the North Sea rose by approximately 120 meters. The trees are now situated on the ocean bed where they have evolved into a natural reef infused with shoals of colorful fish, a diverse variety of plants, and other forms of marine life. In 2014, ancient forests were also discovered along Welsh and Cornish coastlines following stormy weather. As peat was washed away, crooked tree trunks surfaced on the shore near the Welsh village of Borth. Heavy rain and winds also shifted masses of sand and pebbles on beaches in Cornwall, exposing tree trunks of pine, beech, and oak.

The post Undersea ice age forest appeared first on Timberbiz.

Recovered paper demand to grow until 2029

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 36 Minuten

After two years of slowed global recovered paper markets, expanding capacities of recycled fibre based paper and board will re-accelerate demand growth over the next 15 years. Source: Timberbiz Though the recovered paper markets experienced volatility over the last few decades, growth has cooled in the last two years due to decelerating demand and slowing paper and board markets. World recovered paper consumption growth was down from 4% in last 10 years to 1.7% per year in 2013. Over the next five years however, global recovered paper demand is forecasted to re-accelerate alongside recovering paper and board markets. Developing regions will account for about 90% of this demand and seek recovered paper from developed regions, which are major suppliers of recovered papr. These trends and other findings were revealed in Outlook for Global Recovered Paper Markets, a new study by RISI, an information provider for the global forest products industry. “We are expecting to see growth in global recovered paper demand at an average rate of 2.5% per year, reaching 346 million tonnes by 2029. “Meanwhile, world paper and board output will expand by only 1.8% per year over the same period,” said lead study author and Senior Recovered Paper Economist, Hannah Zhao. Global trade is also expected to shift over this period as developing countries see increased demand. “Overall, international trade will remain a key player in the global recovered paper markets even though we’re expecting trade volumes and patterns to change,” said Ms Zhao. “China is the largest consumer and importer of recovered paper, but growth has slowed over the last few years and the nation’s foothold in the market is expected to weaken in terms of import demand. However, key regions could counterbalance market changes with increased imports and demand from other regions over the forecast period.” Analyzing 120 countries, the study identifies investment and trading opportunities that apply to the recovered paper business as well as recycled fiber based paper and board products. Analysis included in Outlook for Global Recovered Paper Markets: Five year outlook of recovered paper market globally, in key regions and key countries Exporting sector, export demand, and destination trends in developed countries Analysis of recovered paper collection systems and recovery rates in emerging economies Breakdown of business structure to identify prominent end-users, processors and traders Future demand, supply and trade forecasts for developing regions to 2019 as well as breakdown of changes in their trading patterns, relevant legislation and policies

The post Recovered paper demand to grow until 2029 appeared first on Timberbiz.

Recovered paper demand to grow until 2029

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 36 Minuten

After two years of slowed global recovered paper markets, expanding capacities of recycled fibre based paper and board will re-accelerate demand growth over the next 15 years. Source: Timberbiz Though the recovered paper markets experienced volatility over the last few decades, growth has cooled in the last two years due to decelerating demand and slowing paper and board markets. World recovered paper consumption growth was down from 4% in last 10 years to 1.7% per year in 2013. Over the next five years however, global recovered paper demand is forecasted to re-accelerate alongside recovering paper and board markets. Developing regions will account for about 90% of this demand and seek recovered paper from developed regions, which are major suppliers of recovered papr. These trends and other findings were revealed in Outlook for Global Recovered Paper Markets, a new study by RISI, an information provider for the global forest products industry. “We are expecting to see growth in global recovered paper demand at an average rate of 2.5% per year, reaching 346 million tonnes by 2029. “Meanwhile, world paper and board output will expand by only 1.8% per year over the same period,” said lead study author and Senior Recovered Paper Economist, Hannah Zhao. Global trade is also expected to shift over this period as developing countries see increased demand. “Overall, international trade will remain a key player in the global recovered paper markets even though we’re expecting trade volumes and patterns to change,” said Ms Zhao. “China is the largest consumer and importer of recovered paper, but growth has slowed over the last few years and the nation’s foothold in the market is expected to weaken in terms of import demand. However, key regions could counterbalance market changes with increased imports and demand from other regions over the forecast period.” Analyzing 120 countries, the study identifies investment and trading opportunities that apply to the recovered paper business as well as recycled fiber based paper and board products. Analysis included in Outlook for Global Recovered Paper Markets: Five year outlook of recovered paper market globally, in key regions and key countries Exporting sector, export demand, and destination trends in developed countries Analysis of recovered paper collection systems and recovery rates in emerging economies Breakdown of business structure to identify prominent end-users, processors and traders Future demand, supply and trade forecasts for developing regions to 2019 as well as breakdown of changes in their trading patterns, relevant legislation and policies

The post Recovered paper demand to grow until 2029 appeared first on Timberbiz.

Nano wonder-wood

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 38 Minuten

  Scientists from Edinburgh Napier University and Sappi have developed a low cost way to turn wood into a wonder material that could be used to build greener cars, thicken foods and even treat wounds. It means Sappi will be able to produce the lightweight material on a commercially viable basis – and without producing large volumes of chemical waste water associated with existing techniques. The energy-saving process will be used in a new nanocellulose producing pilot plant to be erected by Sappi. Sappi is a global company focused on providing dissolving wood pulp, paper pulp and paper based solutions. “Nanocellulose, extracted from wood fibres, has a number of unique optical, barrier and strength properties,” said project coordinator Math Jennekens, R&D director at Sappi Europe. “Unlike other lightweight, high-strength materials based on fossil fuels it is completely sustainable, making it very desirable as a new material for various industrial and transport applications.” The versatile material has previously been produced by intensively processing wood pulp to release ultra-small, or ‘nano’ cellulose fibres – each so small that 2000 could fit inside the width of a single strand of human hair. But the Edinburgh Napier research team said that they have been able to drastically reduce the amount of energy needed to power the process, as well as the need for expensive chemicals. “What is significant about our process is the use of unique chemistry, which has allowed us to very easily break down the wood pulp fibres into nanocellulose,” said Professor Rob English, who led the research with his Edinburgh Napier colleague, Dr Rhodri Williams. “There is no expensive chemistry required and, most significantly, the chemicals used can be easily recycled and reused without generating large quantities of waste water. “It produces a dry powder that can be readily redispersed in water and leaves the nanocellulose unmodified – effectively making its surface a chemical ‘blank canvas’ and so more easily combined with other materials. “The ability to bring all these attributes together has so far eluded materials scientists working in the field. It is very exciting.” Nanocellulose produced at the proposed Sappi plant could be used in a wide range of industrial and everyday products and devices because of the way they can improve the properties of materials they are combined with, said Professor English. “It could be used to thicken water-based products such as paints, foods and concrete,” he said. “Or when it’s used in plastics to make a composite it can replace glass fibres, which is very attractive in the production of the next generation of lighter, fuel-efficient vehicles. “Because of its low oxygen permeability it could also be a possible replacement for plastic films in packaging. “Then there are also applications for it in containing films in lithium batteries and touch screen displays. And as cellulose is inherently bio-compatible and bio-absorbable, there is considerable potential in biomedical applications such as wound dressings and regenerative medicine.” Group Head Technology, Sappi Limited Andrea Rossi said a pilot production plant was being planned for towards the end of this year. “Commercial interest in nanocellulose is growing at a phenomenal rate following predictions of a possible 35 million tonnes per year market by the 2020s,” said Professor English. “And so the key challenge now is very much in business development and understanding the value offered by nanocellulose in our target markets.”

The post Nano wonder-wood appeared first on Timberbiz.

Nano wonder-wood

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 38 Minuten

  Scientists from Edinburgh Napier University and Sappi have developed a low cost way to turn wood into a wonder material that could be used to build greener cars, thicken foods and even treat wounds. It means Sappi will be able to produce the lightweight material on a commercially viable basis – and without producing large volumes of chemical waste water associated with existing techniques. The energy-saving process will be used in a new nanocellulose producing pilot plant to be erected by Sappi. Sappi is a global company focused on providing dissolving wood pulp, paper pulp and paper based solutions. “Nanocellulose, extracted from wood fibres, has a number of unique optical, barrier and strength properties,” said project coordinator Math Jennekens, R&D director at Sappi Europe. “Unlike other lightweight, high-strength materials based on fossil fuels it is completely sustainable, making it very desirable as a new material for various industrial and transport applications.” The versatile material has previously been produced by intensively processing wood pulp to release ultra-small, or ‘nano’ cellulose fibres – each so small that 2000 could fit inside the width of a single strand of human hair. But the Edinburgh Napier research team said that they have been able to drastically reduce the amount of energy needed to power the process, as well as the need for expensive chemicals. “What is significant about our process is the use of unique chemistry, which has allowed us to very easily break down the wood pulp fibres into nanocellulose,” said Professor Rob English, who led the research with his Edinburgh Napier colleague, Dr Rhodri Williams. “There is no expensive chemistry required and, most significantly, the chemicals used can be easily recycled and reused without generating large quantities of waste water. “It produces a dry powder that can be readily redispersed in water and leaves the nanocellulose unmodified – effectively making its surface a chemical ‘blank canvas’ and so more easily combined with other materials. “The ability to bring all these attributes together has so far eluded materials scientists working in the field. It is very exciting.” Nanocellulose produced at the proposed Sappi plant could be used in a wide range of industrial and everyday products and devices because of the way they can improve the properties of materials they are combined with, said Professor English. “It could be used to thicken water-based products such as paints, foods and concrete,” he said. “Or when it’s used in plastics to make a composite it can replace glass fibres, which is very attractive in the production of the next generation of lighter, fuel-efficient vehicles. “Because of its low oxygen permeability it could also be a possible replacement for plastic films in packaging. “Then there are also applications for it in containing films in lithium batteries and touch screen displays. And as cellulose is inherently bio-compatible and bio-absorbable, there is considerable potential in biomedical applications such as wound dressings and regenerative medicine.” Group Head Technology, Sappi Limited Andrea Rossi said a pilot production plant was being planned for towards the end of this year. “Commercial interest in nanocellulose is growing at a phenomenal rate following predictions of a possible 35 million tonnes per year market by the 2020s,” said Professor English. “And so the key challenge now is very much in business development and understanding the value offered by nanocellulose in our target markets.”

The post Nano wonder-wood appeared first on Timberbiz.

Koalas and timber communities can coexist

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 40 Minuten

A letter to NSW Opposition Leader, Luke Foley, from Timber Communities Australia (TCA), has reflected the dismay of the NSW north coast timber communities at the announcement of a new mega-style national park for koala protection. Source: Timberbiz “TCA wrote to Mr Foley and will write to all candidates in the affected region in the upcoming election to remind them it’s perfectly possible to manage forests in a sustainable way and protect native animal habitat at the same time,” said TCA spokesman Trevor Sargeant. Under tight regulations timber harvesting in NSW is excluded from areas where koalas are living. The timber industry has a Koala Code of Practice that TCA supports which ensures a comprehensive approach for the effective management of koalas and their habitat. People who live and work in communities like Wauchope, Kyogle and Grafton enjoy and want healthy koala communities. They also want strong and sustainable communities where people have jobs. “People in regions need access to an honest means to earn their living with jobs in a sustainable industry like timber. This is a basic human right and it is hoped Mr Foley will realise the policy goes too far. It needs to be revisited, “said Mr Sargeant. The surprise announcement came when the need for sustainable natural materials has never been greater and it will only rise in future decades. “Forest industry policies can be win-win with environmental and other positive outcomes. It doesn’t always have to be one or the other,” he said. The triple bottom line of good environment, economic and social/community outcomes is too often portrayed as a tug of war between environment and economic outcomes. “People are tired of oversimplification. It is entirely possible to have positive social and environmental and economic outcomes under truly sustainable policies,” said Mr Sargeant. “It’s time for a change in the debate away from the tired old mantra of “forest wars” to genuine acceptance of the triple bottom line. “There is a great deal of wisdom in these regional communities and it is most concerning when these commonsense voices are overlooked.”

The post Koalas and timber communities can coexist appeared first on Timberbiz.

Koalas and timber communities can coexist

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 40 Minuten

A letter to NSW Opposition Leader, Luke Foley, from Timber Communities Australia (TCA), has reflected the dismay of the NSW north coast timber communities at the announcement of a new mega-style national park for koala protection. Source: Timberbiz “TCA wrote to Mr Foley and will write to all candidates in the affected region in the upcoming election to remind them it’s perfectly possible to manage forests in a sustainable way and protect native animal habitat at the same time,” said TCA spokesman Trevor Sargeant. Under tight regulations timber harvesting in NSW is excluded from areas where koalas are living. The timber industry has a Koala Code of Practice that TCA supports which ensures a comprehensive approach for the effective management of koalas and their habitat. People who live and work in communities like Wauchope, Kyogle and Grafton enjoy and want healthy koala communities. They also want strong and sustainable communities where people have jobs. “People in regions need access to an honest means to earn their living with jobs in a sustainable industry like timber. This is a basic human right and it is hoped Mr Foley will realise the policy goes too far. It needs to be revisited, “said Mr Sargeant. The surprise announcement came when the need for sustainable natural materials has never been greater and it will only rise in future decades. “Forest industry policies can be win-win with environmental and other positive outcomes. It doesn’t always have to be one or the other,” he said. The triple bottom line of good environment, economic and social/community outcomes is too often portrayed as a tug of war between environment and economic outcomes. “People are tired of oversimplification. It is entirely possible to have positive social and environmental and economic outcomes under truly sustainable policies,” said Mr Sargeant. “It’s time for a change in the debate away from the tired old mantra of “forest wars” to genuine acceptance of the triple bottom line. “There is a great deal of wisdom in these regional communities and it is most concerning when these commonsense voices are overlooked.”

The post Koalas and timber communities can coexist appeared first on Timberbiz.

NZ log prices at a high

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 43 Minuten

New Zealand export log prices have risen to a nine-month high as falling Chinese inventories stoked demand in the nation’s largest market. Source: NZ City Local returns were also bolstered by a decline in the kiwi dollar and lower shipping costs. The average wharf gate price for New Zealand A-grade logs rose to NZ$103 a tonne in January, from NZ$101 a tonne in December, according to AgriHQ’s monthly survey of exporters, forest owners and sawmillers. New Zealand log returns are benefiting from a decline in shipping costs, as the price of oil has more than halved from its peak last June and as the New Zealand dollar’s drop to a three-year low makes the nation’s exports more competitive. Chinese log inventories, which climbed last year due to a weak housing market are estimated to have sunk nearer their normal range. “Inventories have come right down to near normal levels, which has been helped by a relatively mild winter in China so far meaning more building can take place,” said AgriHQ forestry analyst Ivan Luketina. “However, with the Chinese New Year approaching there is potential for inventories to rise again, which would likely mean more price decreases.” Mr Luketina said Chinese buyers were “well aware” of the lower shipping prices and declining kiwi dollar and were seeking to have the savings passed on to them. Pruned domestic logs have increased slightly in price and there is good demand for finished products in the US, helped by the declining New Zealand dollar, he said. Still, tight supply in the North Island is keeping log prices elevated, he said.

The post NZ log prices at a high appeared first on Timberbiz.

NZ log prices at a high

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 43 Minuten

New Zealand export log prices have risen to a nine-month high as falling Chinese inventories stoked demand in the nation’s largest market. Source: NZ City Local returns were also bolstered by a decline in the kiwi dollar and lower shipping costs. The average wharf gate price for New Zealand A-grade logs rose to NZ$103 a tonne in January, from NZ$101 a tonne in December, according to AgriHQ’s monthly survey of exporters, forest owners and sawmillers. New Zealand log returns are benefiting from a decline in shipping costs, as the price of oil has more than halved from its peak last June and as the New Zealand dollar’s drop to a three-year low makes the nation’s exports more competitive. Chinese log inventories, which climbed last year due to a weak housing market are estimated to have sunk nearer their normal range. “Inventories have come right down to near normal levels, which has been helped by a relatively mild winter in China so far meaning more building can take place,” said AgriHQ forestry analyst Ivan Luketina. “However, with the Chinese New Year approaching there is potential for inventories to rise again, which would likely mean more price decreases.” Mr Luketina said Chinese buyers were “well aware” of the lower shipping prices and declining kiwi dollar and were seeking to have the savings passed on to them. Pruned domestic logs have increased slightly in price and there is good demand for finished products in the US, helped by the declining New Zealand dollar, he said. Still, tight supply in the North Island is keeping log prices elevated, he said.

The post NZ log prices at a high appeared first on Timberbiz.

NTCA local Government timber conference

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 45 Minuten

The second biennial NTCA Local Government Forest and Timber Industry Conference will be the conference for local government and timber industry professionals. Source: Timberbiz It will be held at the Bayview Eden, Melbourne on 29-30 April 2015. With a focus on socio-economic issues and the relationship between local government and timber industry, the unique program was very successful bringing together these issues in the inaugural conference in 2013. The Conference will provide challenging keynote presentations, highly participative discussions, engaging thought provokers and the opportunity to learn from and share experiences with others across Australia.

The post NTCA local Government timber conference appeared first on Timberbiz.

NTCA local Government timber conference

GFIS - vor 7 Stunden 45 Minuten

The second biennial NTCA Local Government Forest and Timber Industry Conference will be the conference for local government and timber industry professionals. Source: Timberbiz It will be held at the Bayview Eden, Melbourne on 29-30 April 2015. With a focus on socio-economic issues and the relationship between local government and timber industry, the unique program was very successful bringing together these issues in the inaugural conference in 2013. The Conference will provide challenging keynote presentations, highly participative discussions, engaging thought provokers and the opportunity to learn from and share experiences with others across Australia.

The post NTCA local Government timber conference appeared first on Timberbiz.

Durable Hardwoods importing PNG timbers

Australian timber industry news - vor 7 Stunden 47 Minuten

South Australian based Durable Hardwoods, operated by Rod Taverner and Justin Daws, started about 20 years ago with the specific intention of importing timber sourced from low ecological impact village-based operations in Papua New Guinea. After working there for many years Rod had developed an empathy with the country and its people at a grassroots level. “We have broadened our business plan to source and supply timber from ecologically sound sources wherever possible. Our main stock lines are Kwila and PNG Rosewood, two of the finest and most versatile timbers available,” said Mr Taverner. “We dry and dress timber on site to clients’ requirements, whether from our main stock species or other Australian or imported species. The Durable Hardwoods story is one of many features in the latest edition of Australasian Timber … out soon.

The post Durable Hardwoods importing PNG timbers appeared first on Timberbiz.

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by Dr. Radut